zundel

Friday 12

Linux distros compared

Filed under: Open source — Tags: , , , , , , — zundel @ pm

Enterprise Open Source Directory – Operating Systems
GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline

Debian

One of the few really long established Linux distributions, well known for stability and its curated repository of thousands of software packages, it has formed the basis of more Linux distributions than any other.
Capable of a stable configuration that updates and remains stable. Also easy to selectively use newer packages.
Used by many large institutions, with an extensive community of users and developers, well documented, with support readily available.
With a broad developer base and not dependent on any corporate sponsor or owner, change of ownership cannot occur nor vendor lock-in.

Ubuntu

Based on Debian, Ubuntu refreshes it repositories from Debian every six months.
Ubuntu has done a great deal to popularize Linux. And has made some excellent server versions, especially the 10.04 long term support release. But recent focus on consumer appeal and a proprietary interface raise doubts about business suitability and support. The next long term support release coming April 2012 will answer some questions.

SUSE

Not quite as long established as Debian, but the oldest commercial distribution.
The free community distribution openSUSE strikes a nice balance, not cutting edge like Red Hat’s Fedora, but instead stable yet current, with readily available support.
SUSE and openSUSE have the most extensive graphical administration tools.

Red Hat

Well known with a large installed base and good stability, but subscription fees make it expensive.

Fedora

Red Hat’s free community distribution used for testing and experimenting. Not as unstable as it once was, but still not recommended for enterprise work.

CentOS

A free clone of Red Hat.
With version 6 Red Hat changed the packaging of their source code which delayed the release of CentOS 6 by most of a year. Though it has a large installed base, the small number of developers raises doubts about its ability to keep current with Red Hat source and suitability for long-term deployment.

Friday 5

Linux up, Oracle down

Filed under: Open source — Tags: , , , , — zundel @ am

Analysis from the 451 Group predicts the continued growth of Linux and decline of Oracle.

2012 to be year of Linux domination

Our analysis with survey data from 451 Research division TheInfoPro shows server spending for databases and data warehousing favoring Red Hat with Linux over Oracle with either Linux or Solaris. Out of more than 165 server professionals interviewed by TIP, 67% are planning to spend more with Red Hat on database/data-warehousing, and only 6% plan to spend less. The positive figures for Red Hat mirror negative spending intentions for Oracle, with 55% planning to spend less and only 9% planning to spend more.

55% planning to spend less with Oracle.

Linux Will Eat Oracle’s Lunch in 2012, Says Analyst

So Oracle may have more than just a bad quarter.

Oracle’s Bad Quarter: IT Spending Sign, Or Fusion Confusion?

Oracle is not the canary, nor a more up to date indicator species. Its dna is older than that. It’s the dinosaur.

Oracle support portal update could cause chaos, worry users

As customers learn the perils of vendor lock-in, the uncertainty of support, and the potential for independence, Oracle will decline.

Businesses gain experience and confidence with Linux and open source software and look less for expensive hand-holding. The stability and maturity of Linux and the many open source enterprise software packages (such as ERP and CRM systems) allow businesses to assemble their own systems. This is especially appealing to small and medium size business that cannot justify software fees.

Licensing, subscriptions, and service agreements work well for large institutions and unfamiliar technology. But with enterprise class hardware and virtual servers readily available, and rock solid and well maintained Linux and enterprise software available for download, businesses move away from constant fees to use software.

Debian Linux with stability rivaling Red Hat and much easier maintenance will grow in use, as will open source enterprise software such as Adempiere, OpenERP, Project Open, vTiger, CiviCRM, RT, Ants, and OrangeHRM.

Update
Debian passes CentOS as most popular Linux for web servers

Update
Fundamental Oracle flaw revealed
This is complicated but crucially important if you use Oracle databases.
New patches came out today (2012-01-17) but no patches exist for older versions.
This can be a time bomb for large installations and a security risk for all.

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